An Elite Exhibition of MHA Culture

By Logan J. Davis

The MHA Nation has an amazing culture and thanks to the MHA Tourism and the talent of an elite group of dancers and drum group, that culture was on full display at the North Dakota State Fair. The MHA Nation Dance and Culture Exhibition attracted hundreds of enthralled spectators to the west edge of the fairgrounds on three exciting and colorful performances. 

Darin Morsette is the director of MHA Tourism and he was proud of his staff and the dancers and drum group who were the heart and soul of the dance and culture exhibition that took place for three consecutive days during the fair. Morsette was pleased to see so many non-native people come to all of the exhibitions. The majority of spectators were non-native although there were many Native Americans from several different tribes across the states and Canada. The dance performers were all MHA Nation tribal members and the drum group was also MHA. However, there was one lone native who came from Montana. The Eagle Dance was performed by Yahtsi PerkinsKiller of

DONOVAN ABBEY WAS A COLORFUL AND AMAZING PART OF THE DANCE TROUPE OF MHA NATION AT THE ND STATE FAIR LAST WEEK
YAHSTI PERKINSKILLER OF THE WACCANAW DAKOTA NATION PERFORMED THE EAGLE DANCE AT THE NORTH DAKOTA STATE FAIR MHA DANCE AND CULTURAL EXHIBITION
TWO MHA MALE DANCERS DO A FACE OFF BATTLE DANCE FOR THE MANY WHO ATTENDED THE DANCE AND CULTURAL EXHIBITION

Montana and he was honored to be with the MHA Nation dancers and singers in sharing the native culture with the fair-goers who stopped by to enjoy the dance and native traditional songs.

Many questions were answered by the emcee for the MHA Nation Dance and Cultural Exhibition who was Charlie Moran. Moran said each session was well-attended and he also was happy to see the great attendance for each exhibition. Moran explained each dance and the meaning behind them, as well as the significance of the regalia that each of the dancers wore in their performances. Even though most of the dances were from the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara, one of the MHA tribal members wore a colorful Ojibway dance outfit and she did a traditional Ojibway dance. Throughout the three days of dance and singing, the performers were impressive in their regalia and the way they all gave their all in the spirit of the MHA Nation.

Morsette added that the exhibitions were so well-received that the fair executives are eager to see the MHA Nation event a regular part of the state fair.